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Daily Kos Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:28 GMT  

Mitch McConnell knows enthusiasm isn't free!
U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks to reporters at the U.S. Capitol in Washington September 24, 2013. Washington faces two looming deadlines, with the Democrats and Republicans far apart on a solution. The U.S. government runs out o
Goal Thermometer

It was one of the great unanswered questions of the 2014 campaign: How in the world would the uninspiring Mitch McConnell build "enthusiastic" crowds to bring his campaign across the finish line?

Now we know the answer—with a checkbook.

McConnell will pay expenses in return for 'enthusiasm' at events

The Kentucky Republican Party is offering volunteers all-expenses-paid trips to join Sen. Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) campaign bus tour and "contribute to an enthusiastic atmosphere" at his events.

In exchange for transportation, meals, and lodging, the state GOP expects the lucky few chosen for the ride to "join local supporters in contributing to an enthusiastic atmosphere at each of his events."
Please chip in $3 to keep control of the U.S. Senate out of Mitch McConnell's hands!

Defeat Mitch McConnell in just two hours. Sign up to make GOTV calls to Democrats.
I can't say that I'm surprised that McConnell has to resort to such tactics to get people to show up at his campaign events—after all, other than Barack Obama, McConnell is the most unpopular politician in Kentucky. Still, it's pretty embarrassing, so much so that The Hill couldn't get anyone from Team McConnell to talk with them about the story:
Neither the Kentucky GOP nor McConnell's campaign responded to request for comment.
Can't blame them for not wanting to talk about this. Plus, they were probably busy trying to figure out how much cash to set aside for Election Day "enthusiasm."

Pensito Review Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:28 GMT  

Fox News Charges You 89 Cents on Your Cable Bill Every Month, Whether You Want It or Not

89 Cents

The amount Fox News requires cable subscribers to pay for its service every month whether they want it or not, according to Pew Research. Fox "now claims one of the highest average rates per subscriber. Only six non-premium cable channels command higher fees than Fox. CNN, by contrast, is estimated to average 57 cents per subscriber per month and MSNBC, 18 cents," according to Pew.

89 Cents

The amount Fox News requires cable subscribers to pay for its service every month whether they want it or not, according to Pew Research. Fox “now claims one of the highest average rates per subscriber. Only six non-premium cable channels command higher fees than Fox. CNN, by contrast, is estimated to average 57 cents per subscriber per month and MSNBC, 18 cents,” according to Pew.


Mike Luckovich Wed, 01 Oct 2014 14:49:07 GMT  

01/08 Luckovich cartoon: Chilled out

010814-toon-luckovich-ed


ThinkProgress Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:29 GMT  

The Forgotten Victims Of A Capitol Hill Budget Fight

Sequestration may have faded from the headlines, but it's still very real for a variety of vital programs.

The post The Forgotten Victims Of A Capitol Hill Budget Fight appeared first on ThinkProgress.

Tens of thousands of stories about cancelled White House tours. Endless cable news handwringing about travel delays. Hashtag campaigns to blame the whole thing on Obama.

Last year, sequestration made constant headlines. Congress allowed the across the board budget cuts to defense and non-defense programs alike to go into effect, even though they were originally meant to coerce them into a grand bargain budget agreement. It sliced $85 billion from government programs, reducing spending from more than $1 trillion to $986 billion. A number of different programs had to grapple with sharply reduced funding.

Before another round of cuts fully took effect for this year, however, lawmakers reached a budget agreement that partially repealed them for the fiscal years 2014 and 2015. Discretionary spending would have been capped at $967 billion, but instead is set at $1.012 trillion this year and $1.014 trillion the next, including $63 billion of sequestration relief split evenly between defense and non-defense programs.

The impact of sequestration cuts then left the headlines, but that doesn’t mean the pain is over. For some programs, the extra funding meant the bleeding was staunched but the wounds weren’t healed; for others the pain continued at about the same pace.

Meals for the elderly

Last year, the budget cuts devastated Meals on Wheels programs. Many cut back on the meals they handed out, the days they delivered them, and on-site services they offered to give the elderly a place to connect with others during the day. Other organizations that serve the elderly also had to cut back: half reduced transportation services to help the elderly get to the doctor or grocery store, while nearly 40 percent reduced support for family members and caregivers.

Other than Meals on Wheels and nutrition programs, no other programs serving the elderly got restored. “This is really painful for us,” said Amy E. Gotwals, chief of public policy and external affairs at the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging. “Sequestration never stopped. The headlines stopped, but for us this never really went away.”

Those are among the lucky ones to get sequestration’s cuts reversed this year. “We were one of the fortunate programs that did see a restoration of funds in fiscal year 14,” said Erika Kelly, chief advocacy officer at the Meals On Wheels Association of America. “But the pain of sequestration still exists,” she warned. Programs still have long waiting lists, some of which were created to cope with sequestration last year, and some programs are now operating for fewer days.

Last year, more than 70 percent of programs reduced the number of meals they served, more than 70 percent created or added to a waiting list, and one in six had to close a program or meal site. “I just spoke with one of our programs in Maine and learned they are no longer delivering meals on Wednesdays,” she noted. Those changes are still being felt by the seniors who are served.

But a wide variety of other programs are still struggling: “Everything else people might need to live independently, especially if they’re homebound,” Gotwals explained. “Someone to come in to help with chores, transportation to the doctor’s office, legal help.” These programs are not just below pre-sequestration levels, but below what they got in 2010. “It’s particularly acute for seniors programs because the numbers of old and aging are doing nothing but going uphill.” That means programs are creating waiting lists and some smaller programs are even struggling to stay open.

Housing for the poor

When sequestration hit, some low-income people who had finally just emerged from sometimes years-long waiting lists for Section 8 housing vouchers to help them afford rent had them rescinded, and after that many agencies stopped handing out new vouchers when families left the rolls. That meant by the end of last year, about 65,000 fewer people were getting vouchers compared to the year before. “These reductions have deepened in the first half of this year,” Douglas Rice, senior policy analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, said. By March the figure had risen to 90,000 people. Today, just one in four eligible households gets rental assistance, while a record number of families can’t afford their rents and prices climb.

“As far as we can tell, the effect of sequestration cuts on rental assistance is still pretty severe,” he said. While agencies got money this year that should allow them to stop reducing the voucher rolls, it’s only about enough to restore half of them in the second half of the year. “We’d still be down 50 or 60 thousand units at the end of this year,” he said. And that’s assuming agencies “act very aggressively to use that money to issue vouchers and increase the number of families they’re assisting,” he added.

The current budget climate is making many agencies feel nervous about expending any funds. “I think a lot of them have really cold feet about this because they spent all their funding reserves last year,” he said. “There’s a lot of uncertainty about the budget for next year. So some of them are just sitting on their hands right now and waiting to see what happens with the 2015 budget before they start reissuing some vouchers.”

People living in public housing units have also suffered. Agencies have been getting less than half of what they need to make repairs and keep them inhabitable, so we’ve lost about 10,000 to 15,000 units every year for the last 15 years, Rice said. Sequestration reduced those funds even more and “put housing agencies into a much deeper hole in the short-term, which is making it more difficult to maintain their properties,” he explained. If there isn’t additional funding, the number of units lost each year will soon accelerate.

Safeguards for public health

Last year, Americans were at a higher risk of foodborne illnesses, mentally ill people’s health services were jeopardized, and fewer Americans were screened for HIV. This year, most public health agencies had their funding restored in the year-end bill, according to Emily Holubowich of NDD United, an organization that advocates for non-defense discretionary programs, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Federal Drug Administration, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the Indian Health Service.

But the restored funding doesn’t ensure that all of these vital programs were spared. “When you get down to the programs and centers and individual institutes, even down to the grant and contract level, the stories are very different,” she said. “The increase isn’t applied uniformly. Some programs were still eliminated.”

Take domestic violence prevention, which gets some of its money through health agencies like the CDC. CDC funding for rape prevention and education is still below pre-sequestration levels, as is funding from the Violence Against Women Act for domestic violence victims’ legal assistance and transitional housing. The rest of the programs that domestic violence services organizations rely on were restored.

Yet these organizations are struggling to keep up with need. Nearly 1,700 staff positions were eliminated at domestic violence support programs last year. “We’re assuming most of the staff haven’t come back because federal funding for domestic violence is not keeping up with inflation,” said Monica McLaughlin, senior public policy specialist at the National Network to End Domestic Violence. The administrative staff made up the first round of these layoffs, but now those who do direct services like answering hotlines and accompanying victims to court are losing their jobs.

Meanwhile, sequestration, on top of other funding reductions, meant many programs struggled to keep their doors open. “Programs had to take out lines of credit,” she pointed out. “We can assume they’re still digging themselves out of that hole… If you got a loan or line of credit with interest, you’ll have to pay that back.” Last year, domestic violence programs warned that budget cuts were putting women’s lives in harm’s way and could lead to more murders.

Research into new cures

Last year, nearly half of surveyed scientists had laid people off or were about to. Seventy percent had less grant money as compared to 2010. One in five was considering a career in another country.

That’s hard to bounce back from. “I think we saw during sequestration last year that 1,000 fewer scientists were in the system applying for grants, we lost 1,000 researchers,” said Benjamin Corb, public affairs director at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. “Maybe we’ll recover some of them, but even if we recover half of them, who knows what cure or disease treatment would have come out of the other half not coming back?”

The National Institutes of Health is one of just two agencies in public health services that weren’t fully restored from sequestration levels. “Each got about a 3.5 percent increase, which didn’t make up for the about 5 percent cut from sequestration,” Holubowich said. And the impact of funding cuts is still being felt in the scientific community.

“Sequestration didn’t go away,” Corb said. “We got this one year reprieve to catch our breath and start to recover a little bit of what we lost from sequestration, but it’s still on the books for the next eight years.” That’s a difficult model in scientific research, where projects have funding needs far into the future. “It’s hard for scientists to know where their next paycheck is coming from,” he said. “There are people who are just going to leave. Why stick around to have the sword of Damocles hanging over your head? You can go somewhere else.”

The loss of knowledge due to people fleeing the industry could be tragic – but we’ll never really know. Take, for example, a universal flu vaccine, Corb said. We don’t know for sure if sequestration is to blame, but, “Perhaps if we didn’t have sequestration cuts we would have it by now.”

Education for preschoolers

Education programs were mostly restored, but that doesn’t mean things are back to normal in the country’s schools. “In aggregate, the U.S. Department of Education had about two-thirds of sequestration cuts restored,” said Joel Packer, executive director of the committee for education funding. But “funding in the current fiscal year in 2014 is less than what it was in fiscal year 2008, so it’s still six years sort of backward from where we should have been even prior to sequestration cuts,” he said.

As a result, there are 276,700 fewer teachers at work than when the recession ended in June 2009, even as public schools grapple with rising enrollment. That’s 377,000 fewer teachers than schools need Not all of that can be chalked up to federal spending, since states and local taxes make up a large portion of public school budgets, but the cutbacks haven’t helped and have meant “narrowing of curriculum, increasing class sizes, reducing transportation for kids, eliminating after school programs, a whole variety of things,” Packer said.

Head Start, which absorbed sequestration cuts immediately because the programs rely almost entirely on federal funding, got its cuts restored with a “small increase to provide a small inflation adjustment,” Packer said. But the programs are still struggling. Last year, the cuts meant 57,000 preschoolers lost their spots, and “not every child could immediately re-access their Head Start programs,” said Sally Aman, a spokeswoman for the National Head Start Association. Some programs were closed and staff laid off, and “it was not a quick turnaround to reestablish the classrooms or rehire teachers,” she added. “Funding restoration did not mean critical infrastructure and staffing were still in place.”

Schools that rely on federal Impact Aid, mostly because they are on or near military bases and Native American reservations and so don’t have the same tax base as other schools, were also hit by sequestration cuts right away. They fared relatively well in last year’s omnibus budget bill, getting nearly all of the cuts restored minus a couple million dollars. “But the program has been relatively flat-funded for several years,” Packer said, which has led to “unmet needs while there are increased costs and increased enrollment.”

While Impact Aid superintendents all said at a recent conference that they had come back from the extreme measures they took last year, not everything was how it was before, noted John Forkenbrock, executive director of the National Association of Federally Impacted Schools. Some schools were able to plug the hole last year with reserve money and have now used the restored funding to pay back what they borrowed, although they are now behind where they would have been without that move. Some schools, however, didn’t have reserves to dip into and had to lay off staff and take other actions. “I don’t necessarily think they rehired people to fill those slots,” he said. Extracurriculars like arts and music programs that had been cut are also by and large not back yet. “Impact Aid schools are always in caution, yellow lights always blinking,” he added.

And even so, Head Start and Impact Aid are in some ways lucky. “A lot of programs are not fully restored” from sequestration’s cuts, Packer said. Title 1 funding that goes mainly to low-income schools and spending for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act didn’t get restored in the omnibus bill so are still not back at pre-sequestration levels.

***

Things could get worse next year. No one really knows, because Congress hasn’t passed a budget. Sequestration is in theory still on the books and could come back into effect unless lawmakers act to shield programs from the cuts. That uncertainty only adds to the difficulties these starved programs have struggled with, making many wary to put any restored funding back where it needs to be: helping the people they serve.

The post The Forgotten Victims Of A Capitol Hill Budget Fight appeared first on ThinkProgress.

Fox News Admits GOP Is Trying To Increase Obamacare Premiums, Then Tries To Cover It Up

About what you'd expect from the network.

The post Fox News Admits GOP Is Trying To Increase Obamacare Premiums, Then Tries To Cover It Up appeared first on ThinkProgress.

Fox News Obamacare chyron

CREDIT: Screenshot

Fox News admitted on Tuesday that a conservative-led lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act would raise health care premiums for millions of Americans. But then in its on-screen chyron, the network sought to attribute the increases not to the litigants involved in the case, but to President Obama, potentially confusing viewers.

“Could legal challenges to taxpayer subsidies put Obamacare in a death spiral?” Fox host Bill Hemmer asked, pointing to “a new study funded by the Department of Health and Human Services saying the health care law may be damaged beyond repair if you take the subsidies away, if they’re eliminated.”

Ongoing lawsuits are challenging the legality of providing subsidies through health insurance marketplaces in states that refused to set up their own exchanges. If those legal challenges succeed, the analysis that Hemmer is referencing — which comes from the RAND Corporation — did in fact conclude that premiums in those states could increase by as much as 43.3 percent. RAND’s researchers found that if federal subsidies to federally-run exchanges are ruled to be illegal, millions of people would have to pay more for coverage and could leave the risk pool, leading to a death spiral in which only the sickest people remain insured. Enrollment would fall by 68 percent and 11.3 million Americans could become uninsured.

Hemmer and Fox contributor Byron York huffed and puffed about the dangers of such a ruling, calling it “colossal” — despite the fact that the suits have been filed by conservatives, are supported by Republican lawmakers, and have been reported on favorably by the network in the past. The National Review has called the lawsuits and “ingenious” way to halt Obamacare. Fox, celebrated the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals’ ruling against the administration on July 22 by pronouncing, “one by one they’re getting chipped away so it’s starting to collapse.”

And although the price increases are a direct result of a negative ruling, Fox News ran the story under the chyron “sticker shock again for some Obamacare enrollees as premiums set to rise,” implying that the law’s backers would be responsible.

So far, an appellate court in Virginia has ruled that the subsidies were legal, but a three-judge panel on the D.C. circuit disagreed. The full D.C. court is expected to reverse that decision, however, eliminating the circuit split and reducing the possibility that the Supreme Court will take up the matter. Another ruling against the law is still working its way through the legal system.

The administration contends that even though the law does not explicitly state that federally-run exchanges are to offer subsidies for coverage, the intent of its framers — as well as its other provisions about achieving “near-universal coverage” and financial security from medical bankruptcy — strongly imply that such credits must be made available.

The post Fox News Admits GOP Is Trying To Increase Obamacare Premiums, Then Tries To Cover It Up appeared first on ThinkProgress.

The Nativist Roots Of Ebola Hysteria

"Let me emphasize something... Immigration is a part of Ebola," Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) told a local CBS affiliate last week.

The post The Nativist Roots Of Ebola Hysteria appeared first on ThinkProgress.

After the first documented case of Ebola in the United States spread from the victim Thomas Duncan to two health workers in Dallas, Texas, some lawmakers proposed that the U.S. halt flights stemming from the three West African countries hardest hit by Ebola. Others conflated the issue of border security with Ebola-stricken terrorists and unaccompanied child migrants crossing the border, recycling an age-old nativism narrative that highlights public health concerns as a reason to heighten national security and to restrict access to U.S. borders.

“Let me emphasize something… Immigration is a part of Ebola,” Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL) told a local CBS affiliate last week. He stressed that there was a link between a respiratory illness known as enterovirus showing up in young children in America with the “thousands of residents of Central American countries were found with this illness over a year ago in 2013.”

The craze over Ebola has sparked some lawmakers to call for a travel ban despite public health officials saying that such a policy would hinder efforts to prevent the disease from spreading. One Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) official explained that travel restrictions would make it harder to track people. Other public health officials say that a ban is ill-advised because the policy is only a temporary solution that delays the inevitable; a travel ban would hamper efforts to get critical medical supplies into Western African countries; and it could have lasting economic consequences for the countries that are cut off from the world.

This hasn’t stopped politicians from seizing on inflated Ebola hysteria to fear-monger on their political issues of choice, a trend that has long roots in America’s immigration history. Before Ebola became the main public health concern used by restrictionists to criticize immigration-friendly federal guidelines this year, some lawmakers cited other public health concerns. Local officials refused federal plans to open new facilities to house migrant children in Vassar, Michigan; Hazleton, Pennsylvania; and Murrieta, California, out of concerns of contagious diseases, like tuberculosis, swine flu, leprosy, measles, and chicken pox. Thus far, none of those diseases have become widespread even as migrant children have been placed with families and in other shelters across the country.

Associating immigrants with disease has precedent in previous national public health scares. The 2003 global Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic spurred then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg to eat lunch in New York’s Chinatown as a way to quell public health fears in areas with sizable Asian populations. Ten percent of all flights between Asia and the United States that April were cancelled, while Malaysia imposed a temporary ban on travelers from China, Hong Kong, Canada, Taiwan, and Vietnam. At the time, the Centers for Disease and Control (CDC) created 20 quarantine stations located at major ports of entry and land border crossings, prompting one conservative commentator to decry SARS as the next big attack on U.S. soil since September 2001.

In an article about immigration and public health, the immigration-restrictionist group Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) attributed cysticercosis, typhoid, river blindness, malaria, and guinea worm to immigrants. Further, FAIR stated that tuberculosis “has not been wiped out in the United States, mostly due to illegal migration.”

And in one of the darkest chapters of United States immigration detention history in the early 90′s, about 310 Haitian refugees with HIV were imprisoned for about 18 months in the Guantánamo HIV Camp. The move was bitterly ironic considering that they had left Haiti for freedom and safety in America. In his opinion to order the camp’s closure, U.S. District Court Judge Sterling Johnson Jr. stated that the camp was unconstitutional. “The Haitians’ plight is a tragedy of immense proportion, and their continued detainment is totally unacceptable to this court,” he wrote.

America’s xenophobic response to public health crises has some roots in immigration practices from the Ellis Island days. The diagnostic protocol at Ellis Island and other ports of entry often relied on the physical appearance of the immigrant based on the physician’s “gaze.” One doctor in Boston said at the time, “almost no grave organic disease can have a hold on an individual without stamping some evidence of its presence upon the appearance of the patient evident to the eye or hand of the trained observer.” The Johnson Immigration Act of 1924 denied entry into the United States to “any alien afflicted with idiocy, insanity, imbecility, feeble-mindedness, epilepsy, constitutional psychopathic inferiority, chronic alcoholism, tuberculosis in any form, or a loathsome or dangerous contagious disease.” Mandatory detentions were normal for immigrants from Latin America or Asia in the early years, with some health officials saying that it was hard to “read” diseases in the “inscrutable” Asians.

The recent Ebola crisis has thus far not yet expanded beyond a few isolated incidents. Fifty one people, including the fiancee of Duncan, the Ebola victim, had been kept under active monitoring for the past three weeks. All were cleared and released Monday.

Still, fear-mongering tactics persist and are incredibly effective in spawning negative perceptions of immigrants. As academics Laura Seay and Kim Yi Dionn explain in a review of public attitudes to immigration, “prejudice and ethnocentrism can engender support for more restrictive immigration attitudes.” Added to that, Ebola is already part of the national psyche used to portray Africa as a dirty and diseased place, a stereotype that publication Newsweek eagerly paraded on its cover in August.

The hysteria over Ebola has been more widespread than the disease itself. Mississippian parents reacted last week by pulling children out of a school after finding out that the principal had just come back from a trip to Zambia, a country more than 3,000 miles from the closest of the three West African countries (roughly a journey from Los Angeles, California to New York, NY). A teacher from Maine was placed on leave for 21 days, the incubation period of Ebola, after she visited Dallas for a conference. And Americans with West African connections have felt the strongest sting. In Pennsylvania, a teenage football player was “left in tears” after rival players shouted “Ebola” at him.

Even as the Obama administration has taken serious measures to contain Ebola, it’s unlikely that congressional candidates will shy away from using the outbreak in their campaigns. Republicans have historically polled better than Democrats on matters of terrorism and national security, a position that conservative politicians have been keen on equating to unsecured borders in their campaign speeches and ads. With the Obama administration thus far refusing to issue a travel ban, conservatives like Scott Brown (R-NH) have jumped on the opportunity to “close the border,” slamming Democrat candidates for supporting for open borders.

The post The Nativist Roots Of Ebola Hysteria appeared first on ThinkProgress.


PoliticusUSA Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:29 GMT  

Business and Wall Street Agree: Republicans Are Killing the Economy
Now, after over five years of economists' warnings, banks, Wall Street, and the preponderance of retailers have joined Democrats in calling for quick and complete implementation of President Obama's economic policies to save America.

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
Activists Smell Publicity Stunt As State Senator Arrested At Ferguson Protest Monday Night
During a small protest in front of the Ferguson police station Monday night, Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed was arrested for violating an order from police to not block traffic.

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
Kirk Cameron Wants to Steal Halloween and Turn it Into Jesus Day
"You can give them Gospel tracts and tell the story of how every ghost, goblin, witch and demon was trounced the day Jesus rose from the grave"

[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

Paul Krugman Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:30 GMT  

Fly the Derpy Skies
Why was Ron Paul staring at me?
This Age of Derp
We are not having a real discussion.
Friday Night Music, Saturday Night Followup
Live concerts, there's still nothing like them.

Media Matters for America - Latest Items Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:30 GMT  

A New York Times Columnist Spoke At A Fundraiser For A Group Working To Criminalize Gay Sex

New York Times columnist Ross Douthat spoke at a fundraising event for the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), a right-wing legal group that works to defend anti-LGBT discrimination and supported the criminalization of homosexuality.

On October 16, ADF held an event titled "The Price of Citizenship: Losing Religious Freedom in America" in Denton, Texas. The event, which focused primarily on highlighting the alleged tension between LGBT equality and religious liberty, featured a conversation between radio show host Hugh Hewitt and Douthat.

The event also featured an appearance from the Benham brothers, the right-wing activists who lost their HGTV reality show because of their history of extreme anti-gay, anti-choice, and anti-Muslim rhetoric:

The event touched on a number of popular right-wing horror stories about LGBT equality, from the plight of anti-gay bakers and florists, to the outrage over the recent subpoenaing of several Houston pastors. David Benham, who has previously warned that the gay "agenda" is "attacking the nation," urged the audience to take "dominion" of the media and legal system back from the "sexual anarchy agenda":

DAVID BENHAM: Unfortunately, the church, now that we have the keys to authority that Christ gives the Christian church, we give that dominion back through our silence. And so what we see now is the struggle for dominion. And one of the ways that we've lost dominion is because Christians, unfortunately, don't believe in the sovereignty of God. God is sovereign over all things. The Bible says in Psalm 24 "the Earth is the Lord's and everything in it," including government, entertainment, media, education, the legal system, everything. My finances, my sexuality, everything is under God. ... Does this agenda, this sexual anarchy agenda, does it want dominion? Take a look. Has it got dominion in government? Has it got dominion in entertainment? Has it got dominion, I mean, you name it, in the marketplace? Yes. Absolutely it does. How does God get dominion back? ... The government exists for the punishment of evildoers and for the reward of those who do good. The problem is, is when we switch good and evil and evil and good. There's only one institution that can fight that dominion battle, and that's the church. [emphasis added]


Right Wing Watch Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:30 GMT  

Michael Savage: Veterans With PTSD Are Destroying America

Last week on his talk radio program, Michael Savage got into an argument with a caller over whether California lawmakers should rename a San Francisco tunnel in honor of Robin Williams. The caller, who said he was a veteran suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), defended the move, while Savage objected to the plan, claiming that it would promote suicide.

After a lengthy argument, Savage hung up on the caller and proceeded to attack him. “I am so sick and tired with everyone with their complaints about PTSD, depression. Everyone wants their hand held and a check, a government check. What, are you the only generation that had PTSD? The only generation that’s depressed?”

He then blamed America’s problems on those who “cry like a little baby” over depression: “If the whole nation is told, ‘boo-hoo-hoo, come and get a medication, come and get treatment, talk about mental illness,’ you know what you wind up with? You wind up with Obama in the White House and lawyers in every phase of the government, that’s what you wind up with. It’s a weak, sick nation. A weak, sick, broken nation.” 

Savage continued that veterans with PTSD are a “bunch of losers” and recommended that they be more like Michael Savage.

“You need men like me to save the country,” he said. “You need men to stand up and say stop crying like a baby over everything.” He continued that “men are so weak and so narcissistic” that it is “no wonder ISIS can defeat our military.”

HT: RWW reader Kevin.


http://blog.buzzflash.com/rss.xml Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:45:31 GMT  


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liberal adj.
  • Not limited to or by established, traditional, orthodox, or authoritarian attitudes, views, or dogmas; free from bigotry.
  • Favoring proposals for reform, open to new ideas for progress, and tolerant of the ideas and behavior of others; broad-minded.
  • Of, relating to, or characteristic of liberalism.
  • Liberal Of, designating, or characteristic of a political party founded on or associated with principles of social and political liberalism, especially in Great Britain, Canada, and the United States.




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